Sunday, June 23, 2013

Catching Up With Alex Snydman The Interview Part 1!


I was fortunate to catch up with rising star Alex Snydman and discuss his remarkable debut release and kick around some thoughts on music in general.
man is indeed the new kid
Critical Jazz: Tell us about the new record, the positive conceptual idea and most importantly how the overall sound was developed.

Alex Snydman:  In terms of the concept, I have always been moved by icons like John Coltrane (as many have), who discovered a strong sense of Spiritual Meaning in their musical pursuits.  Trane is the most obvious musical example that comes to mind but if you were to look at my bookshelf, you’d see that it’s pretty much inundated with books with messages of Love and Spirit.  I think we all are imbued with this intuition that is always leading us to a place of betterment (which takes many forms), but the notion behind Fortunate Action is really about discovering this voice, learning to listen to it, and trusting in it even if the decisions it is urging us to make are difficult.  It is my belief (and many others) that when we make decisions from this place, the positive benefits ripple out exponentially.  The reason this is so important to me is that I am well aware of how “human” I am and how much better I personally desire to be.  That’s why I read authors like Neale Donald Walsch, Dan Millman, Pema Chodron, Thich Nhat Hanh, and many others.  I try to write music from the inspiration of a concept that I find inspiring…in this case, I was writing the title track of the album from this place. 
In general, the sound of the album was developed from my desire to simply project a sense of warmth in the music…both from the actual repertoire that was chosen, as well as the actual mix and mastering of the album.  All the players who were involved in the album mean a great deal to me both personally and in my musical development, and each of them understand the sense of journey that I wanted to reflect in this recording.  They have all seen my development, and are fully aware of my “late start” on the drums, and have been there to grow with, work it out with, and push one another to new heights.  I feel that by playing with musicians with this depth of personal empathy and friendship, my vision for the record was realized both in terms of concept and warmth of sound.

Part Two of My Interview
 http://www.criticaljazz.com/2013/06/catching-up-with-alex-snydman-interview_23.html
 concept, I have always been moved by icons like John Coltrane (as many have), who discovered a strong sense of Spirithttp://www.criticaljazz.com/2013/06/catching-up-with-alex-snydman-interview.htmlual Mehttp://www.criticaljazz.com/2013/06/catching-up-with-alex-snydman-interview.htmln their musical pursuits.  Trane is the most obvious musicaPart example that comes to mind but if you were to loohttp://www.criticaljazz.com/2013/06/catching-up-with-alex-snydman-interview.htmlk at my bookshelf, you’d see that it’s pretty much inundated with books with messages of Love and Spirit.  I think we all are imbued with this intuition that is always leading us to a place of betterment (which takes many forms), but the notion behind Fortunate Action is really about discovering this voice, learning to listen to it, and trusting in it even if the decisions it is urging us to make are difficult.  It is my belief (and many others) that when we make decisions from this place, the positive benefits ripple out exponentially.  The reason this is so important to me is that I am well aware of how “human” I am and how much better I personally desire to be.  That’s why I read authors like Neale Donald Walsch, Dan Millman, Pema Chodron, Thich Nhat Hanh, and many others.  I try to write music from the inspiration of a concept that I find inspiring…in this case, I was writing the title track of the album from this place.